Smart People Do This to Get into Flow

Skills and habits that will make writing in flow so much easier

Donna Brown

--

Photo by Tianyi Ma on Unsplash

When we learn to do anything, it is hard at first. When we learned to walk, we fell down a lot. Then we got good at walking and now we can get up and walk across a room without consciously thinking about what we do. We were walking in flow.

When you learned to drive, you had to think through each move you made. You thought out every move we had to make. Think about what it was like when you came up to your first traffic sign. You had to know when to let off the gas when to put on the brake, and when and how to put on the blinker. You needed to remind yourself to look both ways before crossing an intersection. You had to think about how to turn the steering wheel. After practicing those driving skills over several weeks and months, you no longer had to think about what you were doing. The actions became automatic. You were driving in flow.

When you learned to read, you had to learn the alphabet, the sounds the letters made, and the words that the sounds produced. You had to string the words together to make sentences and then those sentences to make paragraphs. Soon you were reading and not even thinking about the words that you were reading instead, you in the scene seeing, hearing, tasting and smelling the world of the story, and feeling the emotions of the characters. You had learned to read in a flow state.

The same thing can happen with writing. You can develop writing skills that make writing flow just as easy as walking. You can learn to write in such a way that all you need is an idea, and you can write a scene very quickly because you learned how to write in flow.

Here are a few skills that will help you as a writer get into the flow every day.

Learning Spelling and Grammar

Knowing how to spell words and knowing how to put a sentence together is the backbone of writing in flow. If you don’t know how to spell or how to put words down into a meaningful pattern, it’s difficult to write anything that makes sense.

Reading and reading a lot of good contemporary literature can help you in this skill.

--

--

Donna Brown

Gardener, homesteader, chicken farmer, teacher, and Author of The Locket Saga, a fictional American Historical Family and the Perpetual Homesteader Blog https:/